Mitigation Systems

A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon concentrations in the indoor air of a building.  Also known as a remediation system, a mitigation system will vary depending on the design of your home.  Radon is most commonly mitigated by drawing air from beneath the concrete slab in a basement by a fan located on the exterior of the home.

Sub-Slab Depressurization

Active subslab suction β€” also called subslab depressurization β€” is the most common and usually the most reliable radon reduction method. One or more suction pipes are inserted through the floor slab into the crushed rock or soil underneath. They also may be inserted below the concrete slab from outside the home. The number and location of suction pipes that are needed depends on how easily air can move in the crushed rock or soil under the slab and on the strength of the radon source. Often, only a single suction point is needed.

Sump Hole Suction/Drain Tile Depressurization

Some homes have drain tiles or perforated pipe to direct water away from the foundation of the home. Suction on these tiles or pipes is often effective in reducing radon levels.  One variation of sub-slab and drain tile suction is sump-hole suction. Often, when a home with a basement has a sump pump to remove unwanted water, the sump can be capped so that it can continue to drain water and serve as the location for a radon suction pipe.

Sub-membrane Depressurization

An effective method to reduce radon levels in crawlspace homes involves covering the earth floor with a high-density plastic sheet. A vent pipe and fan are used to draw the radon from under the sheet and vent it to the outdoors. This form of soil suction is called submembrane suction, and when properly applied is the most effective way to reduce radon levels in crawlspace homes.

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